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Late Brigadier Gurmeet Kanwal (Retd.) was a celebrated soldier, author, thought leader and noted strategic affairs analyst. Graduating from the National Defence Academy in March 1972, Brigadier Kanwal went on to command an Infantry Brigade along the LOC and an Artillery Regiment in Kashmir (1993-1994). He also served as Deputy Assistant Chief of the Integrated Defence Staff.

After taking voluntary retirement in 2003, Brigadier Kanwal joined the Observer Research Foundation and served at the Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses and Centre for Air Power Studies. He was Director of the Centre for Land Warfare Studies from 2008 to 2012. He was also the co-founder of two think tanks, Forum for Strategic Initiatives (FSI) and the South Asian Institute for Strategic Affairs (SAISA). In November 2012, he was nominated among 50 Thought Leaders by Mail Today. He was awarded the COAS Commendation Card twice. He had contributed extensively to various journals and leading newspapers, including a column in the Statesman for over two years. He was a regular speaker at well-known international think tanks and military institutions.

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“If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away.”
— THOREAU —

Honours

Life & Work

Writings

Maximising minimum security

Other notable measures included the establishment of a National Security Council with an active National Security Advisory Board, the partial merger of the three Services Headquarters with the Ministry of Defence and the establishment of the Strategic Forces Command to manage India's nuclear...

Hard News | Dec 1, 2004
Asymmetric Warfare-I

Simultaneously, work had commenced on the early 21st century army force to be called Force XXI, to be fully operational by 2010. Force XXI would be followed by a still more modernised new force that would be designed to meet future challenges likely to confront the US army around 2020-25.

The Statesman | Mar 11, 2002
Afghanistan: India must deploy troops

Besides a stable and preferably neutral government, India's political objectives include the following: ensure that Afghanistan does not again become a base and safe haven for terrorists and radical extremists: counter Pakistan's quest for strategic depth, acquire access to Afghanistan and through...

Salute | Mar 5, 2017
Nuclear hazards

Nuclear weapons states must clearly spell out their strategy, inspire confidence in their adversaries that they will abide by their declared stance and should give credible evidence that adequate checks and balances have been built into their nuclear decision-making process and nuclear weapons...

The Statesman | May 30, 2001
Where ISMS have not reached

Gradually, almost imperceptibly, village Malsisar stirs to life. Every village has its Taal, a dry pond with a hard bed.

Sainik Samachar | Nov 1, 1987
Chinese Military-II

China's new strategy focuses on handling limited, short duration conflicts along Chinas periphery and in economically important maritime areas. Henry Kissinger has written: "China has always dealt with foreign dangers, with extraordinary tenacity. it-has survived 5000 years of turbulent history by...

The Statesman | Jan 16, 2002
Pakistan’s Military-I

Now, less than two years later, the General has appointed himself President of Pakistan for five years and signalled that he is here to stay as General Zia-ul Haq. On the demise of General Zia, General Aslam Beg stepped into the power vacuum as COAS and Ghulam Ishaq Khan, a Pakistan Civil Service...

The Statesman | Jul 2, 2001
Indian missiles: Reaching for the sky

These Indian missiles are being developed under the Integrated Guided Missile Project, launched by the Government of India in 1983, under the aegis of the Defence Research and Development Organisation. As the missiles will be purely Indian systems, the enemy will be unable to ascertain their exact...

Jan 1, 1997
Land mines ban: Just a ‘feel good’ convention?

The recently concluded negotiations at Oslo to ban anti-personnel mines are part of the Ottawa Process, begun in October 1996 when 50 States pledged to work together for a total ban on APMs by December 1997. Princess Diana's interest in the welfare of landmine victims and the award of this years'...

TOI | Oct 15, 1997

Condolences

Sharpening the arsenal: India’s evolving nuclear deterrence policy
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The essence of the defence minister's introspection was that ambiguity enhances deterrence. This view has been expressed by several nuclear strategists. Nuclear doctrines are not written in stone and are never absolutely rigid.

Indian Army Vision 2020
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Indian Army: Vision 2020 examines the threats and their changing nature, identifies the key operational commitments, makes a comparative analysis of how other modern armies are coping and offers a considered guide map for a modern fighting force that is light, lethal and wired to meet the operational challenges of the 21st century.

Pakistan’s Proxy War
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Indian Army: Vision 2020 examines the threats and their changing nature, identifies the key operational commitments, makes a comparative analysis of how other modern armies are coping and offers a considered guide map for a modern fighting force that is light, lethal and wired to meet the operational challenges of the 21st century.

Heroes of Kargil

The book “Sharpening the Arsenal: India’s Evolving Nuclear Deterrence Policy” examines the efficacy of India’s declared nuclear doctrine of credible minimum deterrence with a no first use posture and surveys the nuclear arsenals of India, China and Pakistan.